Vegetable Leather

Vegetable Leather

Succulentopedia

Euphorbia punicea – Jamaican Poinsettia

Euphorbia punicea is an unusual, evergreen, succulent shrub that can grow up to 6 feet (1.8 m) tall. The stems are rubbery, semi-succulent…


How To Soften Leather Gardening Gloves

Our pair of gardening gloves is one of our most valuable gardening gear, and nothing beats the security and comfort of leather gardening gloves. Unlike rubber or cloth gloves, they need extra care. Even better, they can last for a long time if you know how to soften leather gardening gloves. In this article, I will teach you the importance of treating your leather gardening gloves and the ways you can soften them, as well as the types of treatment you should avoid.


20 Best Gardening Gloves to Make Your Yard Work That Much Easier

Protect your hands in style.

Gardening gloves are a must-have for every backyard chore, whether you’re weeding your vegetable garden, planting a shrub, or cutting back perennials. They protect your hands from cuts and scrapes and prevent blisters while you're digging or raking (especially if you're tackling major landscaping ideas). You’ll probably need more than one pair: There are so many cute colors and designs, you won't be able to settle on just one. And depending on what task you’re tackling in the garden, you may need a few different types. That's why we've rounded up an assortment of the best gardening gloves right here.

For example, nitrile-tipped fingers and palms are ideal if you’re planting seeds or weeding, as they offer manual dexterity while keeping your fingers dry. Nitrile gloves usually can be tossed in the washing machine too, then air-dried. If you’re trimming hedges or training your rose bushes up a trellis, you need gloves with leather gauntlets, which are long sleeves that extend up your arm to protect you from scratches. Fabric gauntlets are fine for light chores, but branches and thorns often poke through them. If you do a lot of heavy gardening, real leather gloves (not synthetic leather or fabric) tend to stand up to a lot of wear and tear and generally last for more than one season.

Check out these fun, functional gardening gloves to protect your hands while you're working outside, and make sure you pay attention to sizing charts and reviews to ensure a good fit.


Your Dirt Diary

Whether you are a novice gardener or a pro, prefer a structured format or a freestyle one, are interested in record keeping only or also want a place to record the deeper thoughts that come to mind when you’re digging in the dirt (or as soon as you return to the indoors!), you should have no trouble picking a journal from our roundup to be your constant companion as you grow.

Are you starting a journal for the first time, or thinking about upgrading your current record keeping system? Let me know in the comments and share your tips!

Still feeling a little bookish? Here are a few more book reviews to bring you inspiration and guidance:

© Ask the Experts, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. See our TOS for more details. Originally published on March 10, 2020. Last updated: March 24, 2021 at 17:46 pm. Photos © Joy Kieffer, reprinted with permission. Product photos via Bee Paper Company, Clarkson Potter, Hidden Cache Media, Moleskine, Rite in the Rain, Roaring Spring Paper Products, Royal Horticultural Society, Suck UK, Timber Press, and Quiet Fox Designs. Uncredited photos: Shutterstock. With additional writing and editing by Allison Sidhu and Clare Groom.

About Kristina Hicks-Hamblin

Kristina Hicks-Hamblin lives on a dryland permaculture homestead in the high desert of Utah. Originally from the temperate suburbs of North Carolina, she enjoys discovering ways to meet a climate challenge. She is a Certified Permaculture Designer and a Building Biology Environmental Consultant, and holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in liberal studies from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Kristina loves the challenges of dryland gardening and teaching others to use climate compatible gardening techniques, and she strives towards creating gardens where there are as many birds and bees as there are edibles. Kristina considers it a point of pride that she spends more money on seeds each year than she does on clothes.


Watch the video: Veg Tan Leather Wallet Journey - Part 1